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20121104
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to focus its foreign policy effort on issue. former ambassador to iraq chris hill said political gridlock is hurting u.s. foreign policy objectives. and asian policy is a good place to rebuild i partisanship to the discussion is just under two hours. >> thank you all for being here this afternoon, and welcome to georgetown university. we've come together today for a special conversation, a conversation between top diplomats, past and present, each of whom has played a significant role in u.s. asia relations over the past two decades. with representatives from the administrations of george h. w. bush through the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offer their expertise and experience as a look back on the use of service and look forward to the future of u.s.-asia relations. wish to offer my gratitude to georgetown's asian studies program, our school of foreign service, and the korea economic institute who have partnered to bring together some of our countries most respected minds on foreign policy and asia. we are deeply grateful to doctor victor cha a professo
of ideas as to how to cast foreign policy in response to 9/11, such as invading iraq and people were actually advocating this well before we had the 9/11 terrorist attacks. making regime change in iraq the official policy of federal government actually occurred during the clinton administration when the iraq liberation act was passed in 1998 and signed into law by president clinton and supported by many republicans in congress. it had bipartisan support. vice president gore was a supporter, that is why i am not completely convinced that that is a counterfactual point. we have a lot of interest and people were casting around, trying to find solutions. and i do think the initialization of afghanistan was correct, whether that means we need to be there for 10 years or until afghanistan becomes connecticut, that is another matter entirely. but i think the initial strikes against those were necessary and just. but then to go out and pursue regime change, prior to 9/11, they simply casted in search of a solution to a problem with a little class saw. >> libertarianism was fiscally conservat
for china policy and what we can do for foreign policy in general. it will validator system, give us the resources we need. and if we do that, not only the energy, but were way ahead of technology the demographic savers. with the best university, r&d, entrepreneurial spirit and the political system. but we've got to get through this immediate polarization. best overall going to be thinking about next tuesday on the path of fiscal cliff, but the trifecta and stimulating sharpish growth, getting on top of our debt problem and investing in the future all at the same time. i think we can do it. if we can, there's no reason to talk about american decline. >> i want students, friends, faculty, we are going to put a mic in the center aisle if you can start thinking of questions, just line up at the night. i don't own how many will take. as your thinking a lot to ask your guests one of the questions about the future, which is many ways every administration is tested, not by the things they plan to do, but the things that happen they didn't expect, the surprises. the question for all of you i
remarks on foreign policy, particularly the challenges facing the new egyptian government in the foreign policy and region security realm, but i can set the concept of talking a little bit about domestic policy. and here, let me just start off by what seems to be a paradoxical situation, when assessing egypt's domestic landscape. because i'm the one hand, on the level of politics we have truly momentous change in egypt. however, on the level of policy, i would argue that we have much more continuity than change. on the level of politics, the election of president mohamed morsi was truly a landmark event in egypt's political history. he was the first civilian elected to the office of the presidency in egypt. he is also the first islamist to be elected as head of state in any arab country in free and fair elections. and that the islamist movement in question of course is the most impressive by far, the largest and most well-established islamist movement in the world of political islam. so truly momentous change on the level of politics. however, i would argue on the level of policy, we hav
in iran. thank you. [applause] [inaudible] senior professorial lecturer foreign-policy domestic university. give a book coming up, so going to tehran [inaudible] she's the ceo of strategy which she is a co-author www.race for iran. and also coming of a bio here you can write, but hillary also has extensive service in the us government and national security council policy planning staff was one of the few american diplomats in power to negotiate with iran in 2001 and 2002 about afghanistan and other issues. sibley of a person with some first-hand knowledge shared. >> thank you very much. thank you, dr. mattair. it's good to see some friends and student from american university. thank you again for having me. 50 years ago this month, the united states faced perhaps the defining challenge of the cold war and the cuban missile crisis. today, some say we are facing a similar defining test of u.s. foreign policy and how we do with the islamic republic of iran. in this context, it's striking to recall the words of then president john f. kennedy. he warned us as americans that the great enemy of t
campaign promise of a humble foreign policy. that phrase became a bit of a punchline, given the way that the actual events of the bush presidency unfolded. but the idea of humility, i think, is the central to a secured american conservativism. novice and not just in foreign policy, but really and everything else. conservatism is, to my mind, based on two central insights. one is the idea that is more of a temperament than an ideology. the predisposition that you're not going to tear something down until you first understand why it is built. and you don't begin with the presumption that everything that has happened before you in the past, even if it may look arbitrary to you or may not immediately make intuitive sense to you, it doesn't mean that those practices were really random or arbitrary. there may have been good reasons for them. it is worth studying those reasons before you enter a report. secondly, american conservatism is dedicated to conserving a political condition tradition. this is where traditions of all kind become complicated. american conservatism is, in many respec
administration to focus its foreign policy efforts on asia. former ambassador to iraq, chris hill said political gridlock is hurting u.s. foreign policy object is an asian policy is a good place to rebuild bipartisanship. the discussion is just under two hours. >> thank you all for being here this afternoon and welcome to gaston on georgetown company country university. we've kind for a special conversation. a conversation between top diplomats past and present, each of whom has played a significant role over the past two decades with representatives from the administration of george h.w. bush to the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offered their expertise and experience as they look back on their years of service and look forward to the future of u.s.-asia relations. we offer my gratitude to georgetown's asian studies program, our school foreign service and the korea economic institute who have partnered to bring together some of our country's most respected minds on foreign policy and asia. we are deeply grateful to dr. dr. victor cha and director of asian studi
. >> were going to move onto a topic, a foreign policy question. congresswoman, you come to obama administration of course we seem has been criticized for its handling of the deadly attack on u.s. consulate in libya. this attack resulted in the death of ambassador chris stevens but we also now know that he made multiple attempts to get more security and that these efforts went unheeded. do you believe that the obama administration mishandled the situation even after and also in the aftermath of the attack? what could have been done better and should be done better going forward? hochul: absolutely mishandled, and to learn how that their cries for help from people asking for additional support, and to know they were unanswered is unacceptable. estimate of the house armed service committee when we get back to washington will conduct oversight hearings and make sure that our ambassadors and all the consulate personnel across this globe are protected. we've got to make sure they have within me. i would not do as republican leadership in congress, cut $300 million from embassy security
. finally, foreign policy. in the debate the other night, it seemed to me there was a difference between a president who seemed extremely angry, seemed sarcastic, and a map who seems ready to be president of the united states. maybe mitt romney has achieved a great deal in his life and has been successful at everything here's done and barack obama never really was prepared to be president of the united states. we took a chance. we took a chance on a man whose resumÉ would not have been approved to be head of any corporation in this country, a man who never ran a business, a man who never ran a military unit, a map who never met a payroll, a man who had no practical experience. sometimes somebody can have talents to be a great executive, never had a chance to show it before. well, he got his chance. you know, we have the highest unemployment for a sustained period since we had since the great depression. he had his chance, and now we got a chance to have a man who actually has been successful in life in a way that converts itself into being an effective executive putting practicality ahe
night, the presidential debate was on foreign policy, andrew's question is about foreign policy. andrew, welcome. please, ask your question. >> [inaudible] >> moderator: okay, thank you. i think we had a mic problem, andrew, but i'll restate the question. andrew said, does current u.s. foreign policy in the middle east undermine our national security? do you agree or disagree? what steps should be taken in foreign policy in the middle east? mr. mourdock? one minute. mourdock: well, our foreign policy is of critical concern, of course, and in the middle east we must always, first and foremost, stand by our great friend, israel, and also we must be making the message that no options can be taken off the table as we look towards a nuclear iran. but to the bigger point of our national security, you know, it was the former head of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mullen, that said the greatest threat to our national security is our own national debt. the fact that we have now spent ourselves into a $16 trillion debt is inexcusable. the fact that we continue to see the debt limit raised and
states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to be less pro-american, less pro-israel and more independent. but you often hear in washington in particular that the arab awakening means that iran is going to see. it's only arab allies. or as candidate romney says, evidently without looking at a map, iran's only outlet to the sea. this reflects how it is american elite's, not those sitting in tehran here in denial about basic political trends in the middle east, let alone basic geography. by the islamic republic does not believe that serious bashar al-assad will be overthrown by syrians, the key point is that even a post a sovereign government would not be pro-american or pro-israel. and it may even be less seen on keeping the order with israel quiet. and unless a post assad government were taliban like, serious foreign policy will be just fine for the islamic republic. even
and not the modern culture that feels idaho with dairy cows. we need agriculture policy and foreign policy that fits her to her family farms here in new york. and that's what i'll absolutely be focused on. what i've have spoken to farmers around the district, they're not looking for special treatment, that they want to be treated fairly, not be subjected to unfair competition from the big guys out there in the midwest. >> moderator: congressman gibson, 45 seconds on the farm bill. gibson: he's been tracking it all along. i've been very involved in the process. i've got many amendments into the bill. i'm very proud to say with a dairy security there. dairy farmers are now not even cover the cost of production were going to fix that with the martian were putting in there. i've worked with once a shoe from red hook, beginning farmer leader to make sure we inspire new generations to come to the farm and talk about grants and loans and conservation programs. i am proud to say of the friend of the farmer from the farm bureau and even the pharmacy endorsement. i would tell you earlier this week i did an ev
copy will not be festooned with all these post-it notes. as well as the politics and foreign policy editor at slate. he goes to the foreign newsmagazine and when he was the managing editor of foreign policy magazine counted twice won the award for general excellence, which i can tell you with a good feat in itself and particularly impressive given that foreign policy is a relatively small circulation journal, not a deep-pocketed magazines like "vanity fair" or "esquire." both articles and essays have appeared in "the new york times," "washington post" and "wall street journal" and his provide analysis for abc, cnn, msnbc and npr. he's in washington d.c. her very happy to have them with us here today. [applause] the dictators learning curve is a look at an arms race, speaking metaphorically that dictators and democratic activist trying to overthrow and both sides have had to up their game in recent years. for those of you who think foreign policy is about trade agreements, arms treaties come arcing border disputes, let me assure you it's a lively read a stun dobson's travels across t
foreign policy questions and touched on a matter, which i know is not the appointment on the board of the european central bank, which was raised by a man by your president at the beginning of the meeting. the union's commitment to promote the equality of women and men is an objective they done in the treaty. yesterday's to buy your economic committee on the appointment is an understandable expression of concern that a great deal remains to be achieved. notably regarding the european central bank. i note also the committee's recognition that the candidates consequences are in no way disputes here for my part, last week's european council, i made a strong appeal to all heads of state of government identified and oppose female candidates at european level. the economic and financial sectors, with the other representation of women is placed. i underlined that we need to be active in encouraging this process. i hope that this such renewed commitment to gender balance, parliament would base its position on the current candidate on the sole criteria of professional qualification and expe
at home. this question goe to the ressman. >> congressman gibson, question on foreign policy from bruce in stone ridge. doeshe.s.ave a special relationshipith israel ors just another country and why or why not? >> it is a special relationship. for me this is very personal. as a young man, 26, in the persian gulf war, as we were making our move up towards iraq and all the scuds in the area and having the opportunity for a few minutes a day to listen to bbc, and to hear that some of those scuds were landing in israel, i will tell you, at that point, being a student of history and knowing the soviet union still being out, i feared for a regional or maybe even a world war. we asked israel to do something that no country should ever ask another country and that was to not retaliate, and israel did that, even though they head people killed and things destroyed. i could not fully understand how they could do that. it is a very special relationship. we share the same values, the same democratic process, and israel is a friend we will always be there for. i'm proud to support the agreement we ha
the domestic and foreign policy issues pertinent to the upcoming election. it is my pleasure to extend a special welcome to any new commonwealth members of this evening. you'll need the most well-informed interesting people in the bay area when you attend the commonwealth club agents all of whom are as interested as you are in savitt discussion and social interaction. now want to this evening's program, there are question cards you should have been handed on your seats for joan walsh. fill them out, right on the question and there will be collected and we will ask them in the program. there's also a microphone in the audience, were there will be in a while and we will take some oral questions toward the end of the program so i will remind you when the time comes you can line up with a microphone and ask your questions. we appreciate you keeping questions short and please make sure they are questions and not statements. copies of the new book, what's the latter with white people, on sale in the lobby. she will be pleased to sign them outside the room immediately following the program. i
on the cold war, including mining, classicking thes of american foreign policy in the post war era inspired me to do the same with the war. it was no easy task. books on the war built library shelfs, and you can go in and see. how could they say anything new about an event studied thoroughly? what i discovered was we knew very little what was happening in hanoi in the enemy's capitol. while historians wrote countless studies on american leaders, vietnamese counterparts, especially those in the north, received shockingly little attention. how do we know so much about the american side and so little about the vietnamese? it just so happens i entered graduate school when arian kyes from the former and present communist world opened doors. i attempted what previous historians could not, to tell the story in hanoi's eyes. i wanted to answer questions that eluded previous score lars. why was the struggle an international conflict, and how did they manage to defeat the strongest superpower the world had ever seen? talk about being in the right place at the right time. although it was difficult for ov
.s. foreign policy subjective. for the leaders, using these commitments is not only the right thing to do but make sense at a strategic level. >> security has very closely tied together a very basic level we've recognized the health of the country is clearly linked to their prosperity and their productivity and their economic well-being. that is key to the stability. >> here at csis the one to understand the decade teach about the nexus between health and security. the senior men and women in our government and military have grappled with these issues. admiral william fallon, former head of both u.s. pacific and central command, spearheaded military engagement during a 48 year career. >> the military has great cadel lenni to respond. i would say that the military is much better suited to the emergency -- we have a terrific logistics capability. we have accumulated medical and medical related capability. >> we found of the decade of military and health challenges has spread many solutions particularly in the way we provide medical care to those wounded on the battlefield. >> we learn that
diplomacy in the region, and it's part of secretary clinton's economic state agenda. for foreign policy goals, the bottom line is that we need to create more links between the new democracies and american industry. we don't have enough of them. let me conclude by repeating what i said at the outset. there are daunting challenges throughout the region. we need no more proof the that attack in september that took the life of four of our own, and left scars in north africa, but president obama made clear no american violence makes america retreat from the region. we'll bring justice to harm us and our friends, but we will not be detoured from siding with history. we will support our allies, we'll partner with the new democracies to achieve the aspirations of our people. we will be partners. you know, in the last few weeks, i have been reminded of my first trip to north africa. this was early in 2010. i had only been in this job for a few months, and it was before the advent of the arab spring, and i was there to talk to a number of our north african business leaders and educators about pnb
of atrocities the key focus of his administration's foreign policy. this initiative aimed at civilians and holding perpetrators of atrocities accountable. the focus of this initiative is the area and libya. the other initiative come in the second initiative is the open government or airship, which announced in september 2011 but exacerbated in italy. it was launched by governments and ninth society organizations and has grown to include 57 -- now 57 countries and over 300 commitment organizations reaching more than 2 billion teeple, all in just one year. some other countries have already joined her in the process of joining, which i think is a good thing for many arab countries. the partnership is an international airport to improve government performance, encourage participation and enhanced government participation to people and governments throughout the globe. the urban governor partnership of transparency, citizen, protection and accountability. the highlight of the policy of the united state is the memorandum of understanding for corporations that were assigned to the arab league
is on top of it. >> from a foreign policy perspective it might serve the nation better if we were to take action against you if you were to attack other countries. with reason or not, this is not something for nurse will take lately. one of the things we underestimate his reaction of the government. we don't want to assume the venezuelans know what's going on in this or perhaps anything else. so go in and taken action their country but they will perceive as hostile as a really bad idea. we want to set the precedent that these actions are unacceptable and we need to find a strong way to get that message to the people in x land. that doesn't have to be a public message. we don't have representation or come and we see them in vienna, new york, people who can talk to them. we need to start getting the message out back off. >> one last bit of new information and then they want to talk with everybody about how to contain the damage and what kind of reaction. so payback is now hit the controlled system but one of the physically disrupts the process. again, when the company of gas and oil in the
of political reforms or two sides of the same coin. this is the syria way. very much foreign policy as well and elected by both sides of the fence. assad did his job well. he constructed an airtight array of family travel, sectarian-based patronage system that produced loyalties and stability. and as for my good friends in damascus wrote last year, he said quote, for the regime its supporters and its allies, syria is an amateur society, a positive with evidence both real and effective and generally blown out of proportion a series of sideshows violent and seditious proclivities that can be contained only by ruthless power structure, unquote ultimately bashar and his followers cannot trust anyone else in syria. is initial strategic vision for international respected and integrated syria became consumed by syrian paradigm of political survival. he was either unwilling or powerless to stop the response to perceived threats. he returned it to me typically authored touring mode of survival your and alawite fortress to protect, the various governments of syria that co-opted over the years to prot
foreign policy in asia. it is not because of [inaudible] , not because of civilization, but there is a more recent incident where libya [inaudible] it is because of an emerging global war that is being triggered by middle east. now, let me give you a little bit of context. you know, context is sort of like underwear. you don't need a lot of it, but you have to have it first. [laughter] in the past, we thought of the great powers is being the main powers. russia and the u.s. in the past. china, maybe india, and then there was another side, the navy powers or today, the united states. then, there was an american that they called donald fuller. if you put these two ideas together and where the two great powers, the land power in the seapower come together, we call it the [inaudible] the middle east is located in one of the worlds great ones. small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other. simply because it depends on which side they are on or which side they decide to ship two. in the middle east, the old part of that shadowbox wisteria,
what's best for the committee versus what's going to pander to each agenda at the foreign. and some of these are emotional issues i think is a country we go to the american people to have a sound energy policy in place. >> moderator: we have briefly touched on climate change. ann marie buerkle, do you think there's such a thing as global warming? buerkle: i think there is climate change. i've said that over and over again but what i don't agree with is that there has been a consensus on whether not and contributed global warming. what i do know is about to pass cap-and-trade, to pass, to vote for cap-and-trade as dan maffei did that would actually paralyze our businesses and increase their costs and decrease the availability of energy. it's the wrong way to go. there are reasonable approaches to develop energy in this country. we have to do it as a just mention in a reasonable manner or it doesn't hinder to either extreme but to find that ground in the middle that will make this country energy independent, giving all that's going on in the middle east we should be doing everything i
obama is, you know, he's the obviously the first and only black president he's policy an outsider in other really significant ways. he has a unusual name. he was largely grew up in foreign country. he, you know, he worked adds a community organizer with very poor people in a housing project until the south side of chicago. these are things that are extremely suspicious to lots of people in our country. and instead of talking about it doctor directly they use the other terms to code him to describe him as outer calling him a socialist. calling him a communist. these things that manifestly have nothing do with who he is. interest thing about barack obama, if you read his awe disty of hope, his memoir, if you look at the great speech the greatest moment it's about conciliation. this is what how he sees himself. this is an he did want to be a great president. he wanted to bid for greatness and by getting a grand bar iman. doing something bipartisan. he is born conciliators. that's who he is. the sad thing at the end of the day, the tragedy of barack obama is that he was a man who was
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25